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Save the Date for the 5th Annual Symposium: 9/29/2020 at Union South

4th Annual Symposium for Research Administrators

October 8th, 2019 - Gordon Event Center

Page Updated: August 17th, 2019

Symposium Session Program Levels

Basic: Intended for participants who are new to research administration or the topic. These sessions will assume some fundamental understanding of the field of research administration but will be at an introductory or general overview level.

Intermediate: Intended for staff who are interested in learning more about the topic functions and services in research administration. These sessions will require fundamental understanding and will deliver content that exceeds the basics.

Advanced: Facilitators will assume that attendees have strong knowledge of the topic being presented. Discussion will be more in depth. These sessions will focus on mastering more difficult and complex scenarios related to each topic.

Pre-Award: Identifies a topic with a main focus on the pre-award side of the award life-cycle.

Post-Award: Identifies a topic with a main focus on the post-award side of the award life-cycle.

Discussions vs. Concurrent Presentations

Symposium Discussion Groups are facilitated conversations. They may include a short introduction by a panel or presenter but most of the time spent will be in a discussion and interaction as the facilitators share information. No A/V – No Presentation Slides.

Symposium Concurrent Presentations are sessions that include mostly lecture with some time for question and answer. With A/V and Presentation Slides.

Session Topics

9:45am - 10:45am
  • Research Performance Progress Reports (RPPRs) - Tips and Troubleshooting

    Program Level: Intermediate Concurrent

    Description: Grantees submit progress reports at least annually and assessment of these reports are reviewed by NIH grants management and program staff before award of the next non-competing budget period. NIH program or grants management staff may request additional information to evaluate the project for continued funding. A complete and timely progress report submission is important to avoid the agency delaying award funding. Learn to identify those areas of the RPPR that are most often the subject of sponsor questions or requests for clarification.

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session participants will:

    • Locate key information about RPPRs, including resources, guidance, and FAQs
    • Identify differences between Interim and Final RPPRs, including reporting timelines and report sections
    • Understand the process for submitting RPPRs - roles and responsibilities of the PI, Department, Dean’s office, and RSP
    • Locate and utilize campus and sponsor resources for troubleshooting and correcting non-compliant publications

    Presented By:

    • Brenda Egan, Proposal Team Manager in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs
    • Sarah Marcotte, Research Administrator in the School of Human Ecology

    Files:

    Handout - Resources Handout - Tips & Troubleshooting

  • Expense Review: Understanding the Process and Strengthening the Partnership Between RSP and Departments

    Program Level: Post-Award Concurrent

    Description: Have you ever wondered: What is the final expense review? Why does RSP do this? When is it performed? What is the end result? This session will provide an overview of the final expense review process and how it fits into the bigger picture of compliance and internal controls for grants management at UW-Madison. Each step in the process will be identified and discussed with a focus on the roles and responsibilities of RSP and departments to complete the review and submit financial reports. Communication plays a critical role in this process and highlights the importance of a strong partnership between RSP and campus with regard to grants management. This session will examine communication practices between RSP accountants and campus administrators during the expense review process. A deeper understanding of this process will enable administrators to proactively manage grants and contracts throughout the award lifecycle.

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session participants will:

    • Summarize what the final expense review is and why it is done
    • Identify the steps involved in the final expense review process
    • Make the connection between the expense review and financial reports and invoices submitted to sponsors
    • Foster relationships between RSP and departments through effective communication during the expense review process
    • Apply their knowledge of the final expense review process to their daily tasks related to successful award management

    Presented By:

    • Dorothy Johnson, Post-Award Managing Officer in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs
    • Josh Totsky, Accountant in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs

    Files:

    Slides Handout

  • Is it Policy? Procedure? Guidance?

    Program Level: Advanced Discussion

    Description: As research administrators, we want to know what is expected of us and why. We need to be familiar with requirements and know where flexibility exists. Policy, guidance, and procedures help direct our work. They communicate what we must do. They also provide parameters within which we must exercise professional judgment. Let's discuss the differences between policy, guidance, and procedures and explore why it is important to know how they differ.

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session participants will:

    • Learn about and explore the differences between policy, procedure, and guidance

    Presented By:

    • Kim Moreland, Associate Vice Chancellor for Research and Sponsored Programs and Director of RSP
    • Jennifer Rodis, Policy Analyst in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs

    Files:

    Handout

  • Incorporating Wellness into the Workplace

    Program Level: Basic Discussion

    Description: Did you know that the UW has an ongoing initiative to improve wellbeing in the workplace? If you are interested in improving wellness and wellbeing for yourself and others in your department, join us for this interactive discussion! We will share with you the wellness resources available to UW-Madison Staff as well as our experiences leading wellness initiatives in our own offices. Come share your own ideas and experiences related to workplace wellness as we learn together.

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session participants will:

    • Define Workplace Wellness
    • Identify UW-Madison workplace wellness resources
    • Explore wellness related activities that can be incorporated into the workplace

    Presented By:

    • Sara Arscott, PhD, CCRP (SoCRA) Education and Research Program Coordinator, Integrative Health in the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health
    • Melanie Hebl, Education Coordinator in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs
    • Jennifer Taylor, JD, Director, International Faculty and Staff Services

    Files:

    Handout

11:00am - 12:00pm
  • Current and Pending Other Support - Strategies & Tools for Success

    Program Level: Pre-Award Concurrent

    Description: Research administrators are facing a barrage of rapidly changing requirements for current and pending/other support documents. This session will provide a basic update on the changes at the federal level and UW-Madison’s response to such changes. In addition, this session will provide guidance on how to use and maintain the RSP's Current and Pending (Other Support) Tool to assist in meeting the changing sponsor requirements.

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session participants will:

    • Learn the differences in Other Support documents between agencies and recent updates to sponsor requirements.
    • Become familiar with UW-Madison’s policy and guidance for Current and Pending support.
    • Be able to create various agency’s Current and Pending (Other Support) document using the RSP tool.
    • Discover various ways on how to maintain the RSP's Current and Pending (Other Support) Tool and Other Support documents.

    Presented By:

    • Amy Kuehn, Assistant Director-Administration in the Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine
    • Kurt McMillen, Assistant Director for Grant and Proposal Services in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs

    Files:

    Slides

  • Sub-Awards: How to Navigate Issuing Funding to Your Research Partners

    Program Level: Basic Concurrent

    Description: Your PI has received that big NIH award and now you need to give three partnering institutions their portion of the award. What do you do? In this session we will discuss how to determine if your relationship is a sub-award or a vendor agreement. We will cover how to request a sub-award through the RSP sub-award portal and provide tips for avoiding unnecessary delays in finalizing the sub-award agreement.

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session participants will:

    • Differentiate between Sub-awards and Vendors
    • Identify items required to successfully submit request to RSP sub-award portal
    • Follow tips for avoiding sub-award set-up pitfalls and delays

    Presented By:

    • Jay Krafft, Grants Administrator at the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery
    • Jennifer Kuhr, Senior Grants and Contracts Specialist in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs

    Files:

    Slides Top 5 Things You Can Do Questionnaire

  • Successfully Implementing New Policies and Procedures: Change Management Through the Lense of Bayh-Dole Compliance

    Program Level: Advanced Discussion

    Description: Change can be an opportunity but is often difficult. In research administration, unfunded mandates or policy decisions outside our control frequently mean introducing new policies and implementing new processes on a short timeline and with limited resources and support. Join colleagues to hear about the successful implementation of a campus process improvement in response to the 2018 Bayh-Dole Act update. Panelists will represent various roles in the implementation and provide insight into the change process. We will address several aspects of the IVCRGE approach that we believe contributed to the overall success, and open discussion to share insights from other implementations and share tips and experiences that may smooth the path in future process changes.

    Learning Objectives. In this session participants will:

    • Discuss techniques that have proven successful in change implementation at UW-Madison
    • Identify techniques for developing collaborative working groups for successful outcomes.
    • Share stories about successes or challenges and learn best practices from research administration colleagues.

    Presented By:

    • Max Coller, Senior Information Processing Consultant in the Information Technology Office of the VCRGE
    • Kristin Harmon, Intellectual Property Disclosure Specialist in the VCRGE
    • Sarah Marcotte, Research Administrator in the School of Human Ecology
  • Navigating the World of Student Payments

    Program Level: Post-Award Discussion

    Description: When paying a student, it is important to ensure proper classification of the payment in order to satisfy compliance requirements with federal and state regulations, institutional policies, and donor intent. This conversation will help participants think about how to determine the intent of the payment, and how to make the payment correctly to ensure compliance with all applicable rules. Please bring case studies and examples to share.

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session participants will:

    • Be able to find student payment resources on campus.
    • Understand the different types of payments and how to process each type.
    • Be prepared to identify and avoid common problems.

    Presented By:

    • Irina Diaz, Pre-Award Specialist at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research
    • Alex Nelson, Accountant in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
    • Bonniejean Zitske, Assistant Director of Research Financial Services in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs
1:00pm - 1:45pm
  • Excel: Making Research Administration Easier

    Program Level: Basic Concurrent

    Description: If you have ever thought, "there has to be a way to do that" or "ugh, that spreadsheet took forever" this is the session for you! At some point in your career you have likely used Excel for proposal budgets, financial projections, review of financial transactions, or preparation of financial reports. This session won't teach you how to use Excel, but we will show you how to make Excel work for you. Join us to discover the most useful Excel shortcut keys, "fun" tools like Goal Seek, and formulas you can use every day. Come prepared to ask your Excel questions and share with others your own tricks. This interactive session will not be step-by-step tutorial but instead a productive endeavor that you will find useful long after the session has ended.

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session participants will:

    • Apply shortcut keys to create any spreadsheet faster
    • Utilize tools like GoalSeek to prepare a budget or cost transfer
    • Use the handouts and information obtained to create personal templates, formulas and macros.

    Presented By:

    • Shelly Earl, Accountant Advanced in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs
    • Larissa Roberts, Research Administrator in the Biomedical Engineering Department

    Files:

    Slides Slides with Screen Recordings Handouts Ninja Power Moves Create Your Own COMBINE Macro

  • Starting with Self: Diversity and Inclusion

    Program Level: Basic Concurrent

    Description: This session will provide the opportunity to examine one’s own identity within the context of diversity and inclusion initiatives on campus.

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session participants will:

    • Engage in a brief exploration of their self and social identity.
    • Gain a clear understanding of diversity and inclusion and why it matters in the workplace.
    • Learn and share about UW-Madison campus resources related to issues of diversity and inclusion.

    Presented By:

    • Tamie Klumpyan (she/her/hers), Fully Prepared to Engage Program Coordinator in the Office of Talent Management
    • Bonniejean Zitske (she/her/hers), Assistant Director for Research Financial Services in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs

    Slides

  • How Large Departments and Divisions Track and Report Research Data to Leadership

    Program Level: Advanced Discussion

    Description: This session will provide ideas on how campus, divisions and departments report research data. The facilitators will share their thoughts on the challenges faced including handling the large volume of data, nuances in definitions to meet stakeholder needs, and data quality. We will look at data from multiple perspectives including that of the PI, the center/department, School/College and the Central Office. Attendees are welcome to bring examples or questions about their needs for the group to discuss.

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session partcipants will:

    • Learn what resources are available and in use.
    • See options for meeting the reporting needs of different stakeholders.
    • Understand some factors to consider in designing research tracking systems and reports.

    Presented By:

    • Ann Bourque, CPA, PMP, Senior Policy and Planning Analyst in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
    • Michael Geier, Electronic Research Administration Team Manager in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs
    • Swati Gupta, Data Analyst in the School of Medicine and Public Health
  • What is an Off-Campus F&A Rate?

    Program Level: Pre-Award Discussion

    Description: This session will examine campus procedures regarding use of the on-campus vs. off-campus F&A rate. We will provide an overview of the off-campus rate, discuss criteria for its use, and share real world scenarios. Bring your questions and be prepared to share your experiences!

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session participants will:

    • Distinguish the difference between the on-campus and off-campus F&A rate
    • Identify the criteria used to determine whether a project is on-campus or off-campus
    • Discuss real world scenarios and examples of off-campus rate determinations

    Presented By:

    • Robert Andresen, Director of Research Financial Services in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs
    • Steve Flaherty, Research Administrator in the College of Engineering
2:00pm - 2:45pm
  • Outgoing Subaward Management: Invoices, Mods, and Lessons Learned

    Program Level: Post-Award Concurrent

    Description: When the UW authorizes funding to another entity, strings are usually attached. The Uniform Guidance indicates that subawards must be monitored to make sure they’re following federal statutes. During this session we will review a subaward invoice, a subaward modification request, and discuss ideal roles and responsibilities.

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session participants will have a deeper understanding of:

    • How to review subaward invoices
    • How to identify unallowable/problem charges
    • What to consider during the subaward modification process.
    • Discuss unusual subaward challenges, for example, subs not billing, not meeting cost share, not doing the work, PI conflicts.

    Presented By:

    • Sandy Fowler, Assistant Dean at the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, Business Services
    • Bridgett Molinar, Accountant in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs

    Slides

    Handouts

  • PI's Coming and Going, What Do I Do?

    Program Level: Advanced Concurrent

    Description: Investigators often move among institutions during their career and Research Administrators can contribute to making this an efficient process. Learn the procedures, policies, and necessary steps to help an investigator transfer their research awards to your institution or transfer their awards to another institution.

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session participants will:

    • Understand the paperwork/checklist requirements
    • Identify processes and policies associated with PI transfers
    • Become familiar with what offices are responsible for PI transfers

    Presented By:

    • Tammy Kuhn Martin, Assistant Dean in the College of Engineering
    • Debbie Meltzer, Assistant Dean in the School of Medicine and Public Health

    Slides

  • Export Control - Scenarios and Case-Studies

    Program Level: Intermediate Discussion

    Description: Export Control is an area that touches many areas around campus including contracts, research, travel, shipping, and foreign persons’ involvement in projects. While UW-Madison has an export control office, they rely on people across campus to bring potential issues that would not otherwise be spotted to their attention. This session will look at some real-world examples based upon actual events that have occurred on campus and help attendees learn what to look for. A very basic overview of export controls will occur at the beginning of the session and audience participation is encouraged.

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session, participants will:

    • Identify situations where the export control office should be contacted
    • Respond when presented with export control issues
    • Better understand the complexities surrounding export control situations

    Presented By:

    • Tom Demke, Export Control Officer in the Export Control Office, Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Education
    • Bethany Nelson, Export Control Coordinator in the Export Control Office, Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Education

    Handout

  • The Research Administrator's Role in Inclusive Research Practices

    Program Level: Intermediate Discussion

    Description: From study design to research payments, it is imperative to keep inclusion at the forefront of research projects.

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session, participants will understand:

    • How PIs craft inclusive research designs.
    • How researchers ensure a human subjects protocol prioritizes access and considers potential barriers.
    • How research administrators can support faculty members and researchers in inclusive research practices.

    Presented By:

    • Christine Sorkness, RPh, PharmD, ICTR Senior Associate Executive Director

    Files:

    Slides
3:00pm - 3:45pm
  • Mechanical Engineering's Ongoing Quest to Develop the Optimal Award Projections and PI Communication Tool

    Program Level: Post-Award Concurrent

    Description: : To address a need for increased post-award management, Mechanical Engineering developed a dashboard tool in excel for each faculty member’s award portfolio. Each month dashboards are updated, and PI’s receive a communication highlighting any issues that need to be addressed. Additionally. the dashboards are used as a projection tool to aid faculty in planning student funding and award spend-out. This session will highlight how the team tackled the problem and began to more proactively manage sponsored projects, as well as how they continually assess new needs and improve their process. Participants will be encouraged to share their experience with similar issues and the solutions they have found in the hope that more ideas will be generated for participants to take back to their desks.

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session participants will:

    • Understand Mechanical Engineering’s efforts to improve post-award management and facilitate PI communication.
    • Recognize how the department identified needs and developed solutions.
    • Learn how the improvements were received by faculty and how the team continues to refine improve their process.
    • Be provided with time to share their experiences, contributing to the body of knowledge that we can all draw upon to more effectively do our jobs.

    Presented By:

    • Catherine Shults, Pre- and Post-Award Research Administrator in the Department of Mechanical Engineering
    • Zach Smith, Pre- and Post-Award Research Administrator in the Department of Mechanical Engineering

    Slides

  • Navigating the Road from Research Idea to Human Subjects Study Activation

    Program Level: Intermediate Concurrent

    Description: In the complex world of human subjects research, opportunities for scientific discovery and research advancement can be slowed and at times, never initiated if study teams/administrators are not prepared to navigate the path to study activation. In this session we will discuss how to navigate some of the key stepping-stones on this path including:

    • Feasibility- Why is it important and how can you help your investigators determine the feasibility of their proposed study?
    • IRB approval- What information do you need before you start your IRB application?
    • Current and proposed future changes to ARROW to reduce administrative burden.
    • Other institutional requirements- What other approvals might need to be obtained for study activation? (E.g. Biosafety, OnCore registration, Billing compliance)

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session participants will:

    • Understand the key elements of conducting a feasibility review for their new study.
    • Determine what types of training may be needed for key personnel and how to obtain information regarding training guidelines.
    • Prepare information to thoroughly answer questions within the ARROW IRB application and to learn about upcoming changes to the ARROW process.
    • Have a sense of awareness of what resources exist that may assist study teams in the project start-up process and what ancillary committee approvals may be necessary before study activation.

    Presented By:

    • Lynn Haynes, Director of the Office of Research Compliance
    • Lisa Werning, Assistant Administrator of Research in the Department of Surgery, School of Medicine and Public Health

    Slides

  • Administrative Transformation Program (ATP)

    Program Level: Basic Discussion

    Description: The Administrative Transformation Program (ATP) is a wholistic transformation that will right-size administrative complexity, advance operational excellence, and better enable the mission at UW-Madison through the adaption of a cloud-based infrastructure that will allow individuals to easily access and manage information, anytime and anywhere. As a preeminent research institution, its pivotal that the research administration infrastructure and business process are included in this transformation. This discussion session will feature a panel of representatives from the ATP who will provide a brief overview of the program to date with a specific focus on benefits to the research administration enterprise at UW-Madison.

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session partcipants will:

    • Gain a basic understanding of what the Administrative Transformation Program is and how research administration fits into the program.

    Presented By:

    • Kurt McMillen, Assistant Director for Grant and Proposal Services in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs
    • Mark Sweet, Director Grants and Contracts in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs
    • Nick Tincher, CIO and Director of IT in the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Education
  • Do I have a FFS, Grant, or Gift? What Happens When We Get It Wrong? And How Do We Fix It?

    Program Level: Advanced Discussion

    Description: At times, gifts, grants, and fee for service agreements can be hard to distinguish. Getting it wrong can lead to difficulties in management, and may even cause problems with our sponsors, donors, or vendors. Though it seems confusing, there are criteria for making the correct call, and ways to fix situations where the wrong call was made. We will discuss the decision-making process, provide tools for participants to use, and run through some case studies to gain insight.

    Learning Objectives. After attending the session participants will:

    • Be able to determine the difference between FFS, grant or gift
    • Understand how to "fix" the funds that were misdirected to the proper entity
    • Use case studies to determine outcomes

    Presented By:

    • Kelly Mallon, Senior Research Administrator in the College of Letters and Sciences
    • John Varda, Post-Award Managing Officer in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs

    Gift or Grant Checklist

    Case Study I

    HHMI Gift or Grant bonus case study